BBC's 100 Women create bluetooth button to take on public transport attacks

Sexual harassment and attack on public transportation is a "pervasive concern" but "silence and pity" that surrounds it avoids the concern from being tackled, one of the BBC's 100 Women has said.Dr Ellie Cosgrave, a lecturer in metropolitan innovation at University College London, is part of a list of global females from across organisation, charity, sport, technology, academia and entertainment.The 100 females have actually joined

forces to come up with innovative ways to deal with 4 leading concerns for ladies and girls today: the glass ceiling, female illiteracy, street harassment and sexism in sport.Speaking at the Females In Innovation event in London, Dr Cosgrave discussed the"hackathon "she took part in to take on harassment on public transport.What a line up! Now we're pleased to hear from Nancy Kacungira of @BBC100women and Dr

Ellie Cosgrave of @ucl asking"Can females alter the world in a week?"< a href ="https://twitter.com/hashtag/womeninnovate?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw"> #womeninnovate pic.twitter.com/NEb9fq0wkK!.?.!— Emma Bortnik(@EmmaBKTN) March 7, 2018 She said: "Even though we understand that this

is a pervasive concern, that most ladies have actually experienced assault on public transportation in the public world, the silence and the embarassment that accompanies it is among the most significant harmful results in my viewpoint."So if we can share our stories, if we can make some noise and come together through numerous platforms, then I think that is when significant social modification can occur."In a discussion with journalist Nancy Kacungira, Dr Cosgrave stated she belonged to a group that invested a week developing methods to take on the issue, consisting of creating a bluetooth enabled button that could be pressed when someone on public transportation saw an assault.She said:"There is not one single option that is going to solve any big social problem but we all have a contribution to

make so we had representation from engineers, we had marketing, we had a coder, someone who specialises in sexual violence and all of us created our own individual contribution. "She added: "The coder Anne-Marie Imafidon, primary executive officer of Stemettes, created a button Unmute The Commute to raise awareness and make some sound."Let's not make this about the victim of the attack but all take part in making some sound and taking actions.

"The button is something people might use and bluetooth enabled so if someone sees an attack or anything

they are unpleasant with they can trigger the close-by buttons and they would flash, which reveals individuals something is going on."She added:"It's going to take more than a week to fix these substantial concerns however I did feel that at the momemt we are certainly in a wave of extremely capable, really enthusiastic individuals who can resolve it together."